Illinois Historical Markers by County

County Name Location Latitude Longitude Erected Re-Dedicated Erected By Description
Crawford Auntie Gogin’s Store The marker is located in Palestine, at the intersection of Main Street (IL Route 33) and Grand Prairie Streets. 39° 00.104 -087° 36.765 1962 Citizens of Palestine and The Illinois State Historical Society On this block Mary Ann (Elwell) Gogin operated a general merchandise store in the late nineteenth century. One of the first women in Illinois to own and manage her own store, Mrs. Gogin was affectionately known as 'Auntie' to the residents of Palestine.
Crawford Cullom Homestead The marker is located in Palestine at 208 South Jackson Street. 39° 00.070 -087° 36.510 1963 Citizens of Palestine and The Illinois State Historical Society Here stood the home of Edward N. Cullom who with Joseph Kitchell platted the village of Palestine in 1818. They donated to the county land including the public square for the county seat. Early court sessions were held in the Cullom house.
Crawford Du Bois Tavern The marker is located in Palestine at 309 South Lincoln. 39° 00.012 -087° 36.698 1963 The Citizens of Palestine and The Illinois State Historical Society Here stood the Dubois Tavern. Jesse K. Dubois, a close friend of Abraham Lincoln, was an official in the United States Land Office in Palestine from 1841-1842 and from 1849-1853 and later became Auditor of Public Accounts for Illinois. His son, Fred T. Dubois, became a Senator from Idaho.
Crawford Fort Foot The marker is located on the North side of IL Route 33, on the west edge of Palestine, adjacent to the Palestine, IL marker. 39° 00.453 -087° 37.437 1963 Citizen's of Palestine and The Illinois State Historical Society About 1813 the William Eaton family and other restless pioneers considered Fort LaMotte too crowded and therefore constructed a new stockade on a site several hundred yards north of here. A family trait of the Eatons, large feet, led to the name of Fort Foot.
Crawford Fort La Motte The marker is located on the southeast side of Palestine, on the southeast corner of Leaverton and LaMotte Streets, one block north of the cemetery. 38° 59.926 -087° 36.175 1962 Citizens of Palestine and The Illinois State Historical Society About 1812, the settlers in this area built Fort LaMotte for protection from hostile Indians. The pioneers farmed the adjoining land but stayed within easy reach of the protective walls. After the War of 1812 the Indian threat diminished and the inhabitants of the fort became the nucleus of Palestine.
Crawford Governor Augustus C. French The marker is located in Palestine at the intersection of South Pike and Grand Prairie Streets. 39° 00.121 -087° 36.858 1963 Citizens of Palestine and The Illinois State Historical Society On this site stood the home of Augustus C. French (1808-1864) when he was elected the ninth Governor of Illinois. The early settlers in Illinois came mostly from southern states so that French, a native of New Hampshire, was the first 'Yankee' to be elected Governor.
Crawford Houston-Dickson Store The marker is located in Palestine, at the intersection of Grand Prairie and Lincoln Streets. 39° 00.117 -087° 36.682 1963 Citizens of Palestine and The Illinois State Historical Society Two early residents of Palestine, John Houston and Francis Dickson, purchased this lot as the site for a combination dwelling and store about 1818. By 1820 their stock of merchandise provided nearby settlers with goods which they previously had to bring from Indiana.
Crawford Hutson Memorial The marker is located 1.5 miles south of Hutsonville at the Hutsonville Historic Site on Rose Street. 39° 05.392 -087° 39.471 1951 The Illinois State Historical Society Hutsonville was named after the Isaac Hutson family massacred by Indians in 1813 at a spot sixty-four rods due east of this marker. Hutson was killed later in a skirmish with the Indians near Fort Harrison, Indiana.
Crawford Kitchell Grist Mill The marker is located at south edge of Palestine on the west side of IL 33. 38° 59.877 -087° 36.626 1963 Citizen's of Palestine and The Illinois State Historical Society In this area Joseph Kitchell, who settled here in 1817, erected a grist mill and distillery which eliminated the trip to Shakertown, Indiana where the farmers had previously taken their grain. Horses were used for power, grain was taken in pay, converted to whiskey and sold to settlers.
Crawford Palestine, Illinois The marker is located on the west edge of Palestine on IL 33, adjacent to the Fort Foot marker. 39° 00.453 -087° 37.437 4/16/1964 Illinois Department of Transportation and The Illinois State Historical Society This area reminded Frenchman John LaMotte of the land of milk and honey, Palestine. While a member of the LaSalle exploring party, he became separated from the group, traveled down the Wabash River, and first gazed upon the region in 1678. Other French settlers came during the 18th century. Then, by 1812, the westward moving Americans began constructing Fort LaMotte. As the palisade filled with settlers, those desiring more room moved a few miles to the northwest and established Fort Foot.

The settlers in Fort LaMotte were the core of the town of Palestine. Platted in 1818 by Joseph Kitchell and Edward Cullom, the settlement served until 1843 as the Crawford County seat. The growth of the town lagged until a United States Land Office, opened in 1821, gave new importance to the community. Then, people came to buy land, to attend court, for entertainment, and to have their grain milled. Others, like Abraham Lincoln in 1830, passed through the bustling town on their was to settle in Illinois.

The land office continued to give prominence to Palestine. Robert A. Kinzie came in 1831 to purchase 102 acres for $127.68, an area which became the nucleus of Chicago. Augustus C. French (1808-1864) served as a Receiver in the Land Office from 1839 to 1843. A native of New Hampshire, he was the first 'Yankee' to be elected Governor of Illinois. Chosen in 1846, French was forced to stand for re-election under the new constitution of 1848 and won.
Crawford United States Land Office The marker is located in Palestine at the intersection of Main and Market Streets. 39° 00.160 -087° 36.766 11/12/1950 The Illinois State Historical Society A United States Land Office was located at this site in 1820 and operated until 1855. Settlers from as far as Chicago came here to file on homesteads. Young Abraham Lincoln passing through Palestine in 1830 with his family in emigrant wagons noticed a crowd before this land office.

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